Being “dark-skinned” in America is an issue that stems from the days of slavery. It was the traditions of slavery and the plantation society that placed lighter skinned slaves at the top of the ladder, in the “house” with their slave-owners, while the darker skinned slaves were placed at the bottom of the ladder, doing back-breaking labor.

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While the physical chains of bondage may be broken, for many African Americans, “dark skin” and “light skin” is still a psychological prison of self-loathing and envy.

Growing up for Khoudia Diop wasn’t easy.

She struggled to think that she was beautiful as she was often teased about her skin color. Bullies would call her “darkie” and “daughter of the night”. In the beginning, Khoudia would confront her bullies head on. Eventually, she decided to ignore them and direct that energy toward loving herself.

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She decided to give herself a nickname that highlighted her skin in a positive way. She decided to nickname herself, “Melaniin Goddess”.

The rationale behind the nickname is to reference the pigment that gives people their skin tone and to encourage people to be confident in themselves. At the age of 17, Khoudia began modeling with the goal of adding more diversity to the catwalk and encouraging women of all colors to be confident.

When she first began modeling, she had 10 followers but now people all over the world are mesmerized by the rare beauty.

Managed by The Colored Girl Inc., Khoudia hopes to empower women to believe they are beautiful. Now, 2 years later, she lives in New York city and she recently reached 220,000 followers on Instagram.

You can follow her on Instagram at:  Melaniin Goddess

Source: Woman Who Was Made Fun Of Because Of Her Dark Skin Gets The Last Laugh – The Black Loop

Michael Bailey
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